Monday, 5 August 2013

Three Color Steamed Egg


This Three Color Steamed Egg refers to the colors from chicken egg, salted duck egg and century egg. But from my dish you can only see one piece of century egg peeking out from the chicken egg.


I took this recipe from the cookbook A Taste of Home by Andrew Kow. This is the first time I am doing a steamed egg and I was quite excited. Having  three types of eggs in a dish is definitely something I look forwards to.


And you know what? This is also the first time that I am handling raw duck egg. Hah! Hah! When I broke open the first egg, I realized that the egg shell is tough and the membrane is even tougher. Are duck eggs like that or is this the result of the salting process? The egg yolks were gooey and I found it tricky to cut them into smaller pieces. 


As for the century eggs (I used duck century egg), no problems and this batch I bought from Aeon are rather good. The last batch I bought from Tesco was quite difficult to handle because the clay casing was damp and very hard. This one was dry and brittle and removing it was a breeze. It took quite a bit of will power for me not to pop the century egg into my mouth. I love century eggs!!!


I also looked up Martin Yan's Chinese Cooking For Dummies on how to get a smooth steamed egg. The tip is to use one half of the cracked eggshell to measure the water to add to the eggs. For each egg, add three portions of water measured using that half eggshell. Also, when steaming, lay two wooden chopsticks across the steamer's rim and then carefully and securely rest the lid on them. This creates a small air vent that allows excess steam to escape so it won't condense back onto the egg mixture.


So how did my steamed egg turn out? Quite alright, not bad for a first try. The only thing not satisfactory was that it needed a bit more seasoning. Other than that, I was very pleased. Like I said before, I do love my eggs!!











Three Color Steamed Egg
Recipe source : A Taste of Home (Page 68)
(My notes and adaptations in red)

Ingredients :
- 5 eggs (I used 3 eggs)
- 2 salted egg yolks
- 2 century eggs
- 2 Japanese bean curd (I used only one)
- pepper
- chicken stock  (I used 1 tablespoon of light soya sauce)
- 1/2 tsp cooking wine (I used 1 tablspooon)
- 200ml warm water (I measured the water using the eggshell method, i.e. for each egg, fill one half of the eggshell three times with water)

Garnishing :
- spring onions
- fried shallot oil (I used fried garlic oil)
- 2 tbsp light soya sauce

Method :
1. Cut Japanese bean curd into slices and arrange at the bottom of the steaming platter.
2. Cut salted egg yolks and century eggs into small pieces. Arrange on top of bean curd.
3. In a bowl, beat the chicken eggs. Add seasoning and water, mix well.
4. Pour into the steaming platter.
5. Place platter into steamer and steam for 12 minutes (it may take longer, you need to check)
6. When the egg is set, remove from steamer and add garnishing.
7. Serve immediately.



Photobucket

This post is linked to the event, Little Thumbs Up organised by Zoe of Bake for Happy Kids and Doreen of My Little Favourite DIY and hosted by Baby Sumo of Eat Your Heart Out

62 comments:

  1. Hi Phong Hong
    Whenever I am out of idea what to cook, steamed eggs is one of my solution. And steamed eggs dish is when I don't feel like having a heavy meal too. I loves steamed eggs but I am not a fan of century eggs.

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    Replies
    1. Mel, I quite enjoyed this dish. So nice and soft. I like all the three eggs :)

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  2. yummy dish which I havent had in a long time! what are those green berry-like fruits? unriped peppercorn?

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    1. Alan, those berries are from my henna tree!

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  3. Replies
    1. Christine, it was yummy! Next time I want to put more duck egg yolks.

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  4. Replies
    1. Thanks, Sonia! I was so happy my steamed egg turned out well.

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  5. Hi Phong Hong, I love steamed eggs too but minus the century egg. Salted egg is my favorite when I cannot decide what to cook. :))
    Your steamed egg look inviting.

    Have a nice day.

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    Replies
    1. Amelia, I love salted egg too especially the yolk!

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  6. Replies
    1. Jess, I will cook this again. So nice to eat!

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  7. Hi Phong Hong, My grandma used to cook this dish when I was a little girl and I love this dish very much.

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    1. Ann, we always love our childhood dishes. My grandma used to steam eggs with fermented prawns and they were yummy!

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  8. Hi Phong Hong, silky smooth steamed eggs. Now I have the fried and steamed versions to try. Thanks to fellow blogger friends.

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    1. Kimmy, I must try the fried version too as I know I will love it!

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  9. These eggs looks wonderful and nicely done. Thanks for the tips share for steaming this egg. My mother always cover the plate with a bigger plate end up that she need to steam longer to get it done nicely. Next time I will ask her to use chopstick to create some space to allow the steam to evaporate!

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    1. Thanks, Jozelyn! It will also take a bit longer if you create the air vent but worth it to get a smooth custard.

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  10. Replies
    1. Arthur, you should! It is very good, soft and sliky :)

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  11. Oh yum! It's egg party this month! You bring the steamed eggs and I'll bring the fried eggs! I think between us, we could finish everything! Yummy!

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    1. Joyce, I was eyeing your fried eggs! I will try your fried version soon and you are right, we can definitely finish the two dishes between us :)

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  12. Waa...very nice! Mine always curdled because of too high heat...must try your way and see if can get such nice results:D

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    1. Jeannie, you try this method sure can get smooth surface. But it takes a bit longer to cook.

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  13. Your steamed egg looks so smooth and creamy, and I love the addition of the other 2 types of eggs to it!

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    1. Thanks, Mich! I didn't know about this dish until I saw it in the book.

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  14. I loved steam eggs too but never with century eggs. Yours look very smooth, just like tofu.

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    1. Veronica, I guess you don't like century eggs. I love it in spite of the yucky smell :)

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  15. I love this dish :). Usually cook this when am lazy

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    Replies
    1. Very easy to do, hor? I love the soft, silky feel.

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  16. ivy sew http://simplybeautifulhealthyliving.blogspot.com5 August 2013 at 16:07

    Phong Hong, this is so so yummy :) I think I can just eat like that!!! I am also an egg lover :)

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    1. Ivy, I ate it with one vegetable dish. So satisfying!

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  17. Normally I have steamed chicken eggs with century eggs, never thought of adding duck eggs inside! This looks yummy!

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    Replies
    1. Jasline, next time add the duck egg yolks. Very nice!

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  18. Phong Hong, your 1st time of steaming this eggs is so successful! This is the recipe that requires lots of skill in steaming. Look at the surface, so smooth! Bravo bravo!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Jessie! Luckily I checked Martin Yan's book and followed his tips.

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  19. Phong Hong, your steamd egg looks perfect. i like this. Will going to try out this.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, xing hui! Hope you will like this steamed egg.

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  20. PH, this dish features regularly on our dinner menu, haha. I always use a ratio of 1:1:1 for the three eggs, so your recipe is quite a big serving eh. Its so tasty, can eat lotsa steam rice with it.

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    1. That's great, Esther! I only discovered this dish after looking at the cookbook. Then I saw it on a restaurant menu hah! hah!

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  21. PH, this is very good for a first attempt, silky smooth! My first attempt many years back was a disaster, i overbeat it and the egg balooned, it was so funny :))

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    1. Oh, the eggs can balloon? Hah! Hah! There was a lot of air bubbles on teh surface due to the beating and I was worried. Luckily they burst when heated.

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  22. This is a dish that i like.

    Your steamed egg is very smooth.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Angel! Call it beginner's luck!

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  23. Wow looks sedapnya so smooth and silky never tell me or else I Will hop over to your hose to eat I love to eat eggs cook in this way Next time cook let me know

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    Replies
    1. EE, you know how to cook this hah! hah!

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  24. This is my childhood dish. Yours is so smooth. I must bookmarked this!

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Edith! The only steamed egg I have eaten before this one is chawan mushi :)

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  25. Hi PH, thanks for linking this to LTU! I have also cooked this recipe (to be posted later), one of my fav Chinese egg dishes. I saw your ingredient list - got beancurd, that's definitely something new to me. Will try it next time. Your steamed egg looks so smooth, thumbs up!

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    1. Yen, I am looking forwards to seeing your version!

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  26. I've always enjoyed this dish, especially with the addition of other eggs. Yummy!

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    Replies
    1. Shirley, this dish will feature again in my meals. Love eggs!

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  27. This is one of my favourite dish and I liked it with plain porridge.

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    Replies
    1. Cecilia, I will try with porridge next time!

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  28. Those look delicious!! I think I will try them this weekend – they would be great next week for “back-to-school” week!!

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  29. Hi Phong Hong,

    I like Martin Yan but don't really think his egg shell method of estimating the amount of water to add in works. It depends on how you cracked the eggs... *eyes rolled* But I do believe in his chopstick method because the steaming water vapour might damage the steamed egg surfaces...

    Nevermind, yours look beautiful and delicious anyway!

    Zoe

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    1. Hi Zoe, oh I guess you are right! I got lucky trying his method :)

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  30. Hi Phong Hong! The combination of these 3 eggs can be used in many dishes! Yours would be great for a hearty rice meal!

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    1. Thanks, Alvin! I can eat rice with just hard boiled eggs and sweet soya sauce :)

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    2. Hi Kak Phong Hong,
      Yang ni sedaplicious betul!

      No bad for your first time steaming this yummy eggs! Adding tofu is new to me. Next time I also wanna try like yours. :)
      Thanks for sharing this to LTU!
      mui

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    3. mui mui, I am really glad I cooked this steamed egg. Sedap lor!

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